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High-level Taxonomic Menu

Click a clade to browse within that clade.

David Albeck's Photos of Plants

Here you'll find my photos of all kinds of plants. The organization is taxonomic, but I started with almost zero knowledge of botany and have changed my mind a few times about whether to go with Cronquist, APG III, or some other system. My goal is to come up with a layout that a) won't overstrain most Internet connections, b) allows non-botanists (including myself) to find things fairly quickly, and c) isn't completely wrong (give or take a decade or two of genetic research), but d) I don't have a lot of time to update or correct this section of my website, so it may stay in an incomplete or transitional state for a while.

I've included descriptions of most groups, but I practically guarantee that some of the descriptions are oversimplified to the point of being erroneous. This is a photo index first and an introduction to botany second.


If you're not sure what you're looking for, try the visual menu of plant families instead.

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Not sure what you're seeking? Try the visual menu of plant families.

Nympheales (water-lilies and close relatives)

plantae > angiosperms > Nympheales       back to top

Once lumped with the dicots, the water-lily family (and two related families) are now thought to be a separate evolutionary branch.

Please click through to my Nympheales page.

Please click through to my Nympheales page.


Monocots (grasses, lilies, orchids)

plantae > angiosperms > monocots       back to top

The name "monocotyledon" refers to the shape of their seeds - look very closely at a kernel of corn (maize): there's an embryonic plant stem at the base, and the rest of the seed is a single nutrient-stuffed leaf (the plant equivalent of a yolk sac). In contrast, a dicot has two such leaves - that's why you can split a chickpea.

Think of monocots and you should probably think of grasses. It's no big surprise that sedges and rushes are monocots too, if you even realize they aren't true grasses. But lilies and orchids are also monocots, and so are palm trees and banana trees.

Monocots have flowers with petals in multiples of three (though highly modified in most orchids) and major leaf veins arranged in parallel ribs (never branching).

Please click through to my Monocots page.

Please click through to my Monocots page.


Dicots (most flowering plants)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots       back to top

The name "dicotyledon" refers to the shape of their seeds - look at a pea or bean and you'll notice you can split it nearly in half: it consists of two hemispherical leaves attached to a tiny plant embryo.

Dicots have flowers with petals in multiples of four or five, and leaves with branching veins. They're a huge and diverse group, so they don't have much more in common (at least nothing as easy to recognize). Many dicots are either Asterids or Rosids; some are neither.

Asterids

One of the large unranked clades (larger than an order) of dicots, Asterids include, naturally, the Aster family, but also some rather un-aster-like families such as morning glories and rhododendrons.
Please click through to my Asterids page.

Please click through to my Asterids page.


Rosid Orders and Families

Rosids

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > rosids


Bittersweet order (Celastrales)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > rosids > Celastrales

 

Bittersweet Family (Celastraceae)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > rosids > Celastrales > Celastraceae

Euonymus sp.
Local Pond
Asiatic Bittersweet
Local Ponds

Legume order (Fabales)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > rosids > Fabales

 

Legume Family (Fabaceae)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > rosids > Fabales > Fabaceae

A group of herbs that includes peas, soybeans, and peanuts, as well as clover and alfalfa. Most of them have a sort of L-shaped petal arrangement, bear seeds in pods, and have root nodules in which symbiotic bacteria supply them with nitrogen from the air.

Alaskan Lupine
Lupinus nootkatensis
Skagastrond
Lupine
Warmiwanuska
Lupine
Mt Dickerman
Lupine
South Sister
Red Clover, Trifolium pratense
The Pinnacle
Red Clover, Trifolium pratense
Mt. Tripyramid
birdsfoot trefoil
Charles River
birdsfoot trefoil
July 4, 2008


 

Geranium order (Geraniales)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > rosids > Geraniales



 

Geranium Family (Geraniaceae)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > rosids > Geraniales > Geraniaceae

Includes Geraniums, of course: both the the garden plant commonly called "geranium", which is genus Pelargonium, and genus Geranium, the cranesbills. (Blame Charles L'Heritier for splitting Linnaeus' genus Geranium in two in 1789.)

Wild Geranium
Geranium maculatum
Local Pond
Wild Geranium
Geranium maculatum
Local Pond
Wild Geranium
Geranium maculatum
Ponkapoag
Wild Geranium
Geranium maculatum
Ponkapoag
geranium sp.
Parc de la Vanoise


 

Malpighia order (Malpighiales)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > rosids > Malpighiales

Named after a botanist.


 

Passion-flowers (Passifloraceae)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > rosids > Malpighiales > Passifloraceae


Passion-Flower
Breton Life
passion-flower
Butterfly World
passion-flower
Butterfly World
passion-flower
Butterfly World
passion-flower
Butterfly World

Other Malpighiales

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > rosids > Malpighiales > Other


Willow
Salix sp.
Signs of Spring
Willow
Salix sp.
Signs of Spring
Viola sp.
Ponkapoag
violet
Viola sp.
Mt Madison
Birds-Foot Violet, Viola pedata
Prospect Hill


Myrtle order (Myrtales)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > rosids > Myrtales


 

Loosestrife Family (Lythraceae)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > rosids > Myrtales > Lythraceae

Purple Loose-strife
Local Pond
Purple Loose-strife
Yet More Pond Life

 

Willowherb Family (Onagraceae)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > rosids > Myrtales > Onagraceae

Fuchsia sp
Winaywayna
Fuchsia sp
Warmiwanuska
Fuchsia sp
Winaywayna
fireweed
Chamerion angustifolium
Parc de la Vanoise
fireweed
Chamerion angustifolium
Parc de la Vanoise


Rose order (Rosales)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > rosids > Rosales

Rose Family (Rosaceae)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > rosids > Rosales > Rosaceae

A large family with five-petaled flowers, whose petals are often white or pink. Many members bear edible fruit. Plants range from low creepers (strawberries and cinquefoil) to thorny vines (roses and blackberries) to woody trees (cherries, apples, peaches, almonds, rowan).

Eijitsu Rose
Rosa multiflora
local pond
mountain-ash
Sorbus americana
Lincoln & Lafayette
mountain-ash
Sorbus americana
Monadnock, October 2013
Sorbus americana
Monadnock, November 2011
Prunus sp?
Flower Bridge, October 2013
Prunus sp?
Pack Monadnock, April 2012
Dewdrop, Dalibarda repens
Ring around Owl's Head
partridge-foot, luetkea pectinata
Mt Dickerman
Wild Blackberry
Old Speck
Blackberry
Rubus fruticosus
Local Park
Purple-Flowered Raspberry
Rubus odoratus
Shawangunks
dwarf bramble
Rubus lasiococcus
Mt Dickerman
Thimbleberry
Rubus parviflorus
Mt Dickerman
Salmonberry
Rubus spectabilis
Mt Dickerman
Strawberry
Fragaria sp.
Prospect Hill


 

Mallow order (Malvales)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > rosids > Malvales

   

Mallow family (Malvaceae)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > rosids > Malvales > Malvaceae

Often showy, large-petaled flowers with a characteristic central spike.

Desert Globe-Mallow
Sphaeralcea ambigua
Nevada
Malvaceae?
Bretagne
Alcea sp.
Bretagne
Ceiba sp.
Jibou
Hibiscus
Puerto Rico
Hibiscus storkii?
Jardin Botanique
Hibiscus storkii?
Jardin Botanique
Hibiscus
Kona
Hibiscus
Kona
Musk Mallow
Malva moschata
July 4 2009


 

Other Rosids

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > rosids > Other Rosids

Miscellaneous or unidentified Rosids from various families not listed separately above.

Fig
Gumbo Limbo
Fig
Ficus sp.
Gumbo Limbo
Poison Ivy
Toxicodendron radicans
Fall Foliage
Poison Ivy
Toxicodendron radicans
Fall Foliage
wood-sorrel
Mt Moosilauke
Parthenocissus
(no album)





Other Dicots

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > Other Dicots

Other Dicots

Neither asterids nor rosids:

Pink Order (Caryophyllales)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > Caryophyllales

under construction: descriptive text goes here

Cactus Family (Cactaceae)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > Caryophyllales > Cactaceae


Prickly Pear
Opuntia sp.
Nevada
Opuntia sp?
Warmiwanuska
Prickly Pear
Opuntia sp.
Nevada
Cactus
Pisaq
Echinopsis sp.
Warmiwanuska
Cylindropuntia?
Pisaq
Cylindropuntia?
Pisaq
Echinocactus?
Jardin Botanique
Echinocactus?
Montréal


Pink Family (Caryophyllaceae)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > Caryophyllales > Caryophyllaceae


This is a large family of herbs with five-petaled flowers; not easily summarized.

Campion
Silene sp.
(no album)
Ragged Robin, Lychnis flos-cuculi
(no album)
unidentified pink,
Dianthus sp?
(no album)
Maiden pink,
Dianthus deltoides
July 4 2009
Fire pink, Silene virginica
Garden in the Woods
Pink
Local Park
Sandwort
Parc de la Vanoise
sandwort
July 4, 2008
mountain sandwort
Mt Moosilauke
Sandwort
Mt Bond

Purslane Family (Montiaceae)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > Caryophyllales > Montiaceae


Spring Beauty
Claytonia sp.
Pitchoff Mtn.
Spring Beauty
Claytonia sp.
Angel's Landing
Spring Beauty
Claytonia sp.
Mt. Prospect
Spring Beauty
Claytonia sp.
Mt Madison


Pokeweed Family (Phytolaccaceae)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > Caryophyllales > Phytolaccaceae

Includes the pokeweeds, genus Phytolacca.

Phytolacca americana
Local Pond


Knotweed Family (Polygonaceae)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > Caryophyllales > Polygonaceae

Includes buckwheat and rhubarb. Characterized by swollen joints or "knots" in the stems.

mountain-sorrel
Parc de la Vanoise
buckwheat
South Sister
knotweed
My Pond (again)


Protea Order (Proteales)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > Proteales

Families within Order Proteales:
 

Protea family (Proteaceae)

Mostly found in the southern hemisphere; flowers are often spiny.
Protea sp.
Jardin Botanique
Protea sp.
Jardin Botanique
Protea sp.
Jardin Botanique


Buttercup Order (Ranunculales)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > Ranunculales

Families within Order Ranunculales:

Please click through to my Ranunculales page.

Please click through to my Ranunculales page.


Saxifrage Order (Saxifragales)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > Saxifragales



Orpine family (Crassulaceae)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > Saxifragales > Crassulaceae

One of the larger groups of succulent plants

crassulacean?
Mt Bachelor
stonecrop
Parc de la Vanoise
stonecrop?
Mt Bachelor
crassulacean?
South Sister
Sempervivum
Parc de la Vanoise


Saxifrage family (Saxifragaceae)

plantae > angiosperms > dicots > Saxifragales > Saxifragaceae


Tiarella cordifolia
Mt jefferson
early saxifrage
Mt Madison




 

Order Pinales (Conifers)

plantae > conifers

Plants, often large, that bear seeds in cones.
 

Araucariaceae

A family of ancient-looking trees that was indeed much more widespread before the K-T Extinction.
Wollemia nobilis
Jardin Botanique
Araucariaceae?
Bretagne

 

Pine Family (Pinaceae)

Classic conifers with woody cones: pine, cedar, larch, spruce, fir, hemlock, and a few others.
Spruce
Mt. Feake
Spruce
Mts. Morgan & Percival
Spruce
Moat Mountain
Pine
Mt. Baldy



Land Plants Other than Seed Plants

plantae > Other Embryophytes

Mosses, club-mosses (lycopodiopsids), ferns, and horsetails.
ferns other
 

Ferns

plantae > Other Embryophytes > ferns


Unidentified Fern
Breton Life
Chain fern?
April Flowers
Climbing fern
Kiluea
Tree fern
Kona
Interrupted Fern
Local Pond
Cinnamon fern
Blue Hills
Cinnamon fern
Blue Hills
ferns
Local Pond
ferns
Ponkapoag
ferns
Pack Monadnock
fiddleheads
Pack Monadnock
fiddleheads
Pack Monadnock
fiddleheads
Mt Feake

 

Other non-seed plants

plantae > Other Embryophytes > misc


Lycopodium clavatum
Old Speck
Equisetum
Jardin Botanique
Equisetum
Conway
Equisetum
Prospect Hill
Equisetum
Spaulding Mtn
Equisetum
Mt Abraham
Moss
Middlesex fells